twistedchick: General Leia in The Force Awakens (Default)
[personal profile] twistedchick
Are we seeing the end of the Left and the Right, as we know them?

Americans who can find North and South Korea on a map are more likely to prefer diplomacy to war.

Which country is our strongest ally? After dumping (on) Britain and Europe, Republicans are leaning toward Australia.

Being forgetful may mean your brain is working properly. Do I really have to remember the essay I wrote for the NYS English Regents exam?

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayer's dissent warns that the US is turning into a prison state. She's not wrong. Read this.

Body shape analysis with kittens.

Obama on the Trumplackofcare bill. Ignore the grandiosity of the webpage and drop down to the speech. And the Congressional Budget Office's crunched numbers show 22 million would lose health care. Essentially, it is the cynical and uncaring RetroRepublicans trading lives for tax cuts.

And an editorial on why people are in politics, and how this week will define them. Quoting behind the cut: )

Stress

Jun. 27th, 2017 11:53 pm
apollymi: Hudson freaking out, text reads "Game over, man. Game over". I find this completely realisitc for the situation (Aliens**Hudson: Game over man! Game ove)
[personal profile] apollymi
Work is a bit of a pain lately. We've had people taking one test several days for the last two weeks. Routinely there is at least one person a day who is at 5:15 or after getting done. For this particular test, they should be done by 5:00 at the latest. It puts me late getting out, and I'm not sure if I'm going to be able to get the time made up leaving early. LaTrease did offer to let me come in late a time or two this week, but honestly, that would just mean I'd be sitting in the Peachtree Center Mall that much longer in the mornings.

Yes, it would give me writing time, but still...

And Roo is about running me crazy with his newfound insistence on chewing on fingers and grabbing at keyboard keys and snatching food and so forth.

So yeah, I'm a little stressed tonight. I feel sorry for my Mag7 boys and girls.

Definitely sick

Jun. 27th, 2017 07:03 pm
me_ya_ri: white lotus flower on green water with reflection in the water (Default)
[personal profile] me_ya_ri
The cold I thought was coming on last night? Yeah, it's a cold. Head cold plus some digestive upset that might be related to my suddenly horrible eating habits. I went to work for 2 hours and then came home, slept for four hours (yay for cold medicine!) and then had dinner.

I did manage to get 1000 words on the novel. Finished a chapter, had the Ladies show up to be cryptic and strangely threatening, and then give Sinead support. I'm pretty sure this is going to be about a 40K to 50K novel at most. Which is fine. I've passed the 30K mark as of today so I'm good for the 3 novels in 3 months challenge.

Now to see if the cold keeps me from getting the story finished before I go off to the wilds of Montana for camping.

*groans*

Goals for tomorrow include surviving the cold, work, writing, and that's about it. Oh, and getting the POD version done for this week's short story. Didn't work on that today because my brain is gone.

Off to very early bath and very early bedtime with plenty of cold medicine in hopes of kicking this cold quickly. Goodnight all!

Request for clarification!

Jun. 27th, 2017 08:36 pm
benedict: (mod bee)
[personal profile] benedict posting in [community profile] auexchange
Power Rangers nomination! Do you mean the television show? We can't tell.

Shadow Hunters nomination! The tag: "AU: 2x03 True love's kiss awakens Alec Malec accidental soulbond + parabatai (Shadowhunters)" requires some clarification because we are confused. Please comment and explain a bit more what you mean.

Leverage and Lethal Weapon nominations! Please remove your crossover ships (replace them if you wish): Relationship: Martin Riggs (Lethal Weapon) & Mr. Quinn (Leverage) under Lethal Weapon and Relationship: Lindsey McDonald (AtS) & Eliot Spencer under Leverage.

Epic Dessert

Jun. 27th, 2017 07:35 pm
ysabetwordsmith: (gold star)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today, in Reasons Not to Hurl the Planet into the Sun, I discovered that Cracker Barrel has a new dessert for summer: Campfire S'Mores.  This consists of a graham cracker crust, warm fudge brownie, roasted marshmallow, and melty chocolate bar accompanied by a scoop of vanilla ice cream drizzled with dark chocolate sauce.  *DROOL, SLOBBER*  It's harder than it looks to translate recipes across different cooking modes, such as bringing a campfire classic into the kitchen.  I've had several attempts at indoor s'mores, including the pretty good s'more dessert pizza at Brixx, but nothing that compares to this.  So if you like s'mores and you're near a Cracker Barrel, go try this.  \o/

EDIT 6-27-17: Someone has thoughtfully posted a copycat recipe.  This will be useful after the special concludes in August. Meanwhile go throw money at the people who invented this, in hopes they will make more awesome food.

YOU GUYS

Jun. 27th, 2017 07:03 pm
yhlee: icosahedron (d20) (d20 (credit: bag_fu on LJ))
[personal profile] yhlee
I scored the following used RPGs from Little Wars for a SONG:

- Mutants and Masterminds
- Wraith: The Oblivion
- Aeon limited edition
- Star Wars Core Rulebook ([personal profile] dhampyresa, do you want this? I'm happy to send it to you--it's Wizards of the Coast's d20 system)
- Mage: The Ascension (we may already have this BUT I DON'T CARE)
- Changeling Storyteller's Guide (now I just have to find the core book for Changeling)
- Wraith Player's Guide
- Battlefleet Gothic 2002 Annual (I looooooooove the aesthetic of the Battlefleet Gothic miniatures and am sorry I only own one, which is still unassembled in its blister pack)
- Earthdawn (I used to own this before my stepmother threw it out)
- Ars Magica (ditto)
- and a stray issue of Playboy July 1995 because it was sitting there lonely and I am easily amused

PLEASE, VAN, CONTINUE ACQUIRING AND SELLING USED RPGs. I WILL COME BUY THEM!!!

This is like Christmas.

Tuesday Yardening

Jun. 27th, 2017 04:12 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is beautiful, cool, and sunny.  I trimmed brush around the purple-and-white garden, finishing that round.  \o/   

EDIT 6/27/17: Round 2, I watered plants.  Then I hauled 4 garden carts full of brush from previous projects to the brush pile in the ritual meadow.  I have not yet picked up the giant ring of trimmings around the purple-and-white garden though.

EDIT 6/27/17: Round 3, I sprayed week killer in the old raspberry patch and in the streetside yard.  In some places there is poison ivy as far as the eye can see.  >_<  I expected that, because it is a "bandage" plant that appeared in disturbed earth, but I do not want it here.  I have firmly suggested that Gaia patch the ground with something else, such as the grass I spent two weeks planting there.  Some of the grass has grown in beautifully, but other areas remain stubbornly bare dirt or noxious weeds.  Ah well, it's a work in progress.
yhlee: icosahedron (d20) (d20 (credit: bag_fu on LJ))
[personal profile] yhlee
I've been interested in game design for some time, but when I started in elementary school, either there were no resources or they were hard to find. It was already hard to find books in English when I lived in South Korea. We did have Base access for a couple years while my dad was still in the Army, and then he left the Army to teach at Yonsei University and we lost Base access and, with it, access to the library. In any case, it would never have occurred to me to look for books on "game design." I don't think I heard of it as an area of study until college or possibly after. I spent a lot of high school trying to design a cockamamie chess variant, and I did read up on real chess variants (Chinese chess, Japanese chess, Burmese chess, etc.). It wasn't *good*, and the one time a couple friendly strangers over the internet volunteered to playtest it, they confirmed the ruleset wasn't any good, no doubt because I had devised the pieces' moves to be ~symbolic~ for storytelling purposes (it was worldbuilding for a fantasy novel) and I didn't know anything about board game design.

Since then I have made a point of reading books on game design when I can find them, and the occasional article on the web. While I have released a couple of small interactive fiction games (IFs) and the narrative game Winterstrike (Failbetter Games), I don't really consider myself a game designer. It's more in the nature of something I do on the side because I find it illuminating to consider alternate ways to approaching narrative; I think primarily as a writer of static fiction. And for the purposes of the hexarchate, it's research because I decided that one of the factions (the Shuos) abuses game design techniques in their pedagogy, and one of the characters (Jedao) is a gamer.

The Kobold Guide to Board Game Design, ed. Mike Selinker, is a collection of essays by various designers. I was originally going to read the book through and do a report on the book overall, but I liked the essays enough to do individual reports on some of them. cut for length )

Thank you to the person who donated this book!
twistedchick: General Leia in The Force Awakens (Default)
[personal profile] twistedchick
My grandmother Nellie had a younger brother, Jack, who was friendly and cheerful and helpful and became a baker (and all-around general cook, but that was later). He taught my mother his recipe for piecrust, and it never failed either of us: behind cut -- my comments in ( ) )

Jack was the kind of character that I wish I'd met when I was older -- I think I met him once when I was 4, which wasn't that memorable. As I said, he was a baker, and he was engaged to this girl that everyone in the family liked (which might have been difficult, since Jack was the youngest of 9 and the family tended to be protective of their littlest brother, never mind that he was in his 20s.) And on the day of the wedding ... she didn't show up. Neither did his best man. They'd eloped.

It broke his heart. He couldn't stay in the Ottawa Valley any more; it was just too uncomfortable. So he took a job as a cook on a ranch in Alberta, took the train west, and came back at Christmas when he could. He taught my mom to knit, because he knew how to knit his own socks, and held her skeins of yarn for her while she wound them into balls, telling her stories of the ranch all the time. He taught her how to make piecrust, and a cake that wouldn't fall, and a lot more. Nellie would write to him and get frustrated when he didn't reply -- someone from the ranch would stop at the post office in town once a week or so -- so after two attempts that got no answer one year she put on the address, "If not claimed within two weeks, addressee is deceased; please return to sender." He wrote back really fast after that, and made a big joke of it.

When he came back during World War I, both his parents were dead (his mother a few years earlier but his father died in about 1917-1918) and were buried out in the little cemetery by the river church, without a headstone. He went around to visit all his brothers and sisters, asking for a little money to pay a stone cutter, and got nowhere. And yeah, he could understand that farmers and small merchants had a hard time during wartime, but there was family pride at stake too. So he dug into his own pocket, and one day a gravestone, a tall, elegant granite marker, appeared over their graves. Engraved on it was, "Sacred to the memory of Daniel and Catherine McNeely," and their dates and I think (it's been a while since I saw it) a pious verse of some sort. But in another line, underneath, "Erected by their son, John McNeely." (Never mind his three older brothers, and five sisters.) Nobody in the family took it badly, and some found it really funny, but under it all people were grateful that it had been done. And they all thought it was very much a Jack thing to do.

When he died in the late 1960s, after several years in a nursing home back in the Ottawa Valley, near family, he was buried near his parents, and the marker was altered to add his name and dates.

So, please, use Uncle Jack's Piecrust Recipe, and welcome, and pass it along. I don't want it to vanish into the place where good memories go when nobody remembers them any more.

Ukiah Picture heavy

Jun. 27th, 2017 10:58 am
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
Sunday (night before last) I had a little 5 hour job in a hotel.  It went well.  Was fun to come out of that job and walk past part of the Gay Pride Parade. Very colourful. 

Around 3pm the dog and I headed for Ukiah.  Read more... )

Poetry Fishbowl on Tuesday, July 4

Jun. 27th, 2017 01:29 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This is an advance announcement for the Tuesday, July 4, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. This time the theme will be "gender, orientation, and identity." I'll be soliciting ideas for QUILTBAG folks, queer allies, homophobes and other identity bigots, boomerang bigots, gender scholars, the oppressed, the misunderstood, ordinary people, outcasts, abuse survivors, the women that men don't see, questioning, debating labels, losing everything, looking in the window, taking people for granted, surviving oppression, hiding in the closet, coming out, upstanding, speaking truth to power, punching up, protesting, telling your own story, bedrooms, classrooms, counseling offices, churches, government buildings, libraries, cities, alleys, bars, parades, liminal zones, self-discovery, self-awareness, QUILTBAG pride, pride flags, other symbols of identity, birth control, reproductive freedom, sex toys, assumed male gaze, same-sex marriage, alien sex/gender dynamics, unpaid labor, self-sacrifice, emotional labor, disruptions, subversive education, humility, humiliation, social evolution, appreciation, identity literature, and poetic forms in particular.

I have a linkback poem, "The Emulsification of Humankind" (14 verses, Torn World). 

If you're interested, mark the date on your calendar, and please hold actual prompts until the "Poetry Fishbowl Open" post next week.  (If you're not available that day, or you live in a time zone that makes it hard to reach me, you can leave advance prompts.  I am now.)  Meanwhile, if you want to help with promotion, please feel free to link back here or repost this on your blog. 

New to the fishbowl? Read all about it! )

swan_tower: (Default)
[personal profile] swan_tower

How often is the thing that brings a story to life a question of grammar? And yet, I know exactly what Linda Nagata means. Here she is, explaining how verb tenses turned out to be the key:

***

cover for THE LAST GOOD MAN by Linda NagataIf there ever was one bright spark, one bit of insight, one unexpected plot twist that brought The Last Good Man to life, I don’t remember it. What I do remember was how flat and uninteresting the manuscript felt to me in the earliest days.

This wasn’t an unusual situation for me. Beginnings are hard and it can take time to work out a tone and style that feels right. So I kept pushing forward, telling myself that if I kept going, the essential spark that every novel needs would eventually ignite.

It didn’t happen. Not for over 30,000 hard-fought words. Sure, the story was advancing but I wasn’t happy with the tone or with the way it was being told—and I didn’t know why.

I’d done my preliminary work—a lot of preliminary work. I’d been tossing ideas into the literary stew pot for months, revising my synopsis again and again. This was a very near-future story centered on a small private military company—contract soldiers of the sort hired by corporations, NGOs, and the US government. These were “white hat” mercenaries, choosy about their clients, working only for the good guys, and though they were a small force, that force was amplified by the autonomous robotic weaponry they could deploy. And I had an unusual protagonist in True Brighton.

Middle-aged women are not generally considered cool enough to serve as the lead in a techno-thriller, but I wanted to give it a shot—I wanted the challenge—so I made True forty-nine years old, a retired US Army veteran and mother of three who is still fit, strong, and agile enough to qualify for field missions.

All the pieces seemed right. For months I’d sensed the potential in this story, but still somehow the spark was missing.

Up to this point I’d been writing in third person, past tense. Then—30,000 words in and on the verge of despair—I chanced to read a novel written in third person, present tense and I was intrigued. Could I write The Last Good Man in third person present?

Present tense is commonly used with first person, where the narrator relates the story using “I” or “we.” I’d done a whole trilogy in first-person present. But I’d never written in third-person present. Inspired by the novel I was reading, I decided to try it.

And I liked the energy of it! It was just a technical change, but at last the tone of the story felt right. I continued to move ahead, writing additional pages every day in present tense, and at the end of the day I would revise my past work, gradually shifting it from past tense to present, adding detail as I did.

I was far, far happier with the feel of the story. The change in tense had given it the spark it needed—or maybe it had given me the spark I needed. Whichever it was, I never considered shifting back.

***

From the cover copy:

Scarred by war. In pursuit of truth.

Army veteran True Brighton left the service when the development of robotic helicopters made her training as a pilot obsolete. Now she works at Requisite Operations, a private military company established by friend and former Special Ops soldier Lincoln Han. ReqOp has embraced the new technologies. Robotics, big data, and artificial intelligence are all tools used to augment the skills of veteran warfighters-for-hire. But the tragedy of war is still measured in human casualties, and when True makes a chance discovery during a rescue mission, old wounds are ripped open. She’s left questioning what she knows of the past, and resolves to pursue the truth, whatever the cost.

“…a thrilling novel that lays bare the imminent future of warfare.” —Publishers Weekly starred review

Linda is a Nebula and Locus-award-winning writer, best known for her high-tech science fiction, including the Red trilogy, a series of near-future military thrillers. The first book in the trilogy, The Red: First Light, was a Nebula and John W. Campbell Memorial-award finalist, and named as a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2015. Her short fiction has appeared in Analog, Asimov’s, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Lightspeed, Nightmare, and several anthologies.

Linda has lived most of her life in Hawaii, where she’s been a writer, a mom, a programmer of database-driven websites, and an independent publisher. She lives with her husband in their long-time home on the island of Maui.

Website | Twitter

Originally published at Swan Tower. You can comment here or there.

Vultures love volleyball, apparently.

Jun. 27th, 2017 01:17 pm
klgaffney: photo of two turkey buzzards in flight (turkey buzzards; vulture girl; freedom)
[personal profile] klgaffney
Miss Mousie and W are trying to put up a volleyball net in the backyard.

The vultures are very excited about this potential new toy. 'YAY NEW PERCH/SUNNING POST FOR US Y/Y?' There have been several attempts to approach and investigate, climb and land on the poles.

Mousie was last seen stomping back up to the back field, muttering something about winged cats.

(The solution will involve taking it back down until her friends actually show up, so the birds don't get tangled up or hurt.)

[EDIT: Nope, never mind, they have suddenly Decided they hate the net, and now they won't even so much as fly over it. They land all the way on the other side of the field, walk around it and into the barn. They are so weird.]

*random* One of these days I will get around to swapping out my turkey buzzard icon for a pic of our vultures.

IN other, less fun news, our insurance company sent us a list of the repairs they want us to make on the outbuildings, including the barn. I would love to fix up our barn too! Being able to preserve that bit of history would be amazing; I would love nothing better! Please send us a big box of money, and we'll get right on that.

In more heartening news, I woke up to more responses to my new job hunting inquiries and quite a bit of activity around my profile, so maybe the repairs can happen sooner rather than later.

Also the twins have had their annual physical so they are cleared to participate in Sheriff's Youth Week; we are forced to conclude that there is no evidence that they are either aliens or changelings.

Pinch hits

Jun. 27th, 2017 09:08 am
bridgetmkennitt: (Umbrella)
[personal profile] bridgetmkennitt posting in [community profile] npt_admin
There are 2 pinch hits that need to be claimed. If you'd like to write for one of them, please comment below with which pinch hit you'd like and your AO3 name. Comments are screened. 24 hours later, a name will be chosen randomly for each pinch hit.

Pinch Hit #9 )

Pinch Hit #10 )

Useful Links
Not Prime Time 2017 (with schedule) | Prime Time Madness 2017
Frequently Asked Questions | AO3 exchange faq for participants | Pinch Hitting faq
2017 nomination tag set
Dear Prime Time Player on DW
2017 Requests available on AO3 | in a txt file

(no subject)

Jun. 27th, 2017 10:47 am
yhlee: two voidmoths at war (hxx Raven Stratagem)
[personal profile] yhlee
An interview [Lightspeed Magazine] by Christian A. Coleman. Note that the interview mainly discusses Raven Stratagem, so there are spoilers for Ninefox Gambit. I also hint at what's coming in the third book, Revenant Gun.
ladyofleithian: (darkpilot: ben's fall)
[personal profile] ladyofleithian
In which Ben duels Naris, says goodbye to Poe, and many other things.

Disclaimer: I own nothing.

Author's Notes: Trigger warning for graphic violence and mentions of (not carried out) child murder.

Our enemies deserve to suffer. )

Note to Self

Jun. 27th, 2017 09:24 am
redsixwing: Red-winged angel staring at a distant star. (Default)
[personal profile] redsixwing
food )

[story] The Ghost and Its House

Jun. 27th, 2017 10:04 am
yhlee: sleepy kitty (Cloud)
[personal profile] yhlee
For P.H.
Prompt: "ghost consciousness."

The house had lain ruined for decades upon decades, quiescent at the edge of the town. Once, it was said, a fine family had dwelled there, wealthy at first, much given to parties and entertainments. The oldest people in the town still remembered the parties: the music of string quartets, and cakes decorated with spun-sugar ornaments, and couples dancing gaily through the night. But now none of the windows had glass in them anymore, save for a few sharded teeth, and the wind blew freely through the rooms where people had once gathered to gossip.

Nevertheless, the house was not entirely uninhabited. A ghost remained attached to the house, and it murmured to itself during the long winter nights, singing tuneless ghost-songs of the shapes that shadows make in the dark, and the sounds that mirrors make when no one is around to hear them, and footsteps in the distant wood. The ghost did not remember the name of the person it had been, once upon a time, but neither did this make it unhappy.

In time a pregnant cat moved into the house for the shelter it offered. The ghost did not remember much about cats, except that they liked cream, and it had no such thing to give the cat. But it had other things to offer. It encouraged the old closets to throw their doors open and disgorge their rotted linens so that the cat would have something to nest in, and it offered all house's hiding places, as well as the lullaby of the crooning wind.

For her part, the cat was a pragmatist. She did not share human prejudices against ghosts, and a ruined house was as good as any other place for her to raise kittens. She merely made sure that there were no raccoons or the like already occupying the place, and then she set to building her nest in earnest.

Cats are not the most talkative of folk, but this cat was friendlier than most. She asked the ghost why it lingered in the house, instead of going to its rest the way humans usually did. While she didn't always put credence in human stories, she had heard that ghosts usually stayed in the realm of the living because they had left some task unfinished.

The ghost said to the cat, "The only task is the task of the house itself. It was my home when I lived, and it remains my home in death."

"Then I am sorry I cannot help you," the cat said, dismayed in spite of the very pressing matter of the kittens she expected to arrive in a matter of days. "A human could help you restore the house, but I am a cat. I may have clever paws and whiskers, but they are no good for building."

The ghost's laughter gusted through the house, although it tried to keep the worst of the cold from the cat. "What do I care about restoration?" it said. "Perhaps once, when I had flesh, it would have mattered to me. But now I am a creature of shadows and dust and ash, and this house suits what I am now. I can keep it safe for you and your kittens. They can play in the house's halls and grow to adulthood without fear of being chased out by human owners; is that not enough?"

"If that is the case," the cat replied, "I shall gratefully accept your hospitality, and my kittens and I will keep your house free of mice."

"It is a very old bargain," the ghost said, "and if it suits you, it suits me."

Two days later, the kittens were born without fuss, or more fuss than the usual, anyway, and in the years to come, generations of cats made their home in the house. They probably live there still. As for the ghost, it has been busy adding the songs of cats to its repertoire. The result is noisy, but none of them mind.

Invisible 3 Release Day

Jun. 27th, 2017 10:49 am
jimhines: (Snoopy Writing)
[personal profile] jimhines

Invisible 3 CoverINVISIBLE 3, a collection of 18 essays and poems about representation in SF/F, is out today! The ebook is edited by myself and Mary Anne Mohanraj, and is available at:

Amazon | B&N | Kobo | iBooks | Smashwords | Google Play

As with the first two volumes in this series, all profits go to benefit Con or Bust.

Here’s the full table of contents:

  • Introduction by K. Tempest Bradford
  • Heroes and Monsters, by T. S. Bazelli
  • Notes from the Meat Cage, by Fran Wilde
  • What Color Are My Heroes? by Mari Kurisato
  • The Zeroth Law Of Sex in Science Fiction, by Jennifer Cross
  • Our Hyperdimensional Mesh of Identities, by Alliah
  • Erasing Athena, Effacing Hestia, by Alex Conall
  • Not So Divergent After All, by Alyssa Hillary
  • Skins, by Chelsea Alejandro
  • The Doctor and I, by Benjamin Rosenbaum
  • My Family Isn’t Built By Blood, by Jaime O. Mayer
  • Lost in Space: A Messy Voyage Through Fictional Universes, by Carrie Sessarego
  • Decolonise The Future, by Brandon O’Brien
  • Natives in Space, by Rebecca Roanhorse
  • I Would Fly With Dragons, by Sean Robinson
  • Adventures in Online Dating, by Jeremy Sim
  • Of Asian-Americans and Bellydancing Wookiees, by Dawn Xiana Moon
  • Shard of a Mirage, by MT O’Shaughnessy
  • Unseen, Unheard, by Jo Gerrard

Huge thanks to the contributors for sharing their stories and experiences. I’ve learned so much from earlier volumes in this series, and this one was no different.

And hey, if you haven’t seen the previous volumes…

INVISIBLE: Amazon | B&N | Kobo | iBooks | Smashwords | Google Play

INVISIBLE 2: Amazon | B&N | Kobo | iBooks | Smashwords | Google Play

If you’re a reviewer and would like a copy, please contact me and let me know your preferred format and where your reviews are published.

Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

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